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Transition from Coal to Natural Gas Uneven in Practice

China's natural gas consumption has surged in the first 11 months of 2017 due to strong demand from industry and winter heating.

China's natural gas consumption has surged in the first 11 months of 2017 due to strong demand from industry and winter heating, official data showed Monday.

The country saw a 18.9-percent year-on-year rise in natural gas consumption, which totaled 209.7 billion cubic meters in the January-November period, according to the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), the Xinhua News Agency reported.

The growth was 12 percentage points higher than that in the first half of the year and more than 8 percentage points higher than the average growth in the previous five years, NDRC spokesperson Meng Wei said at a press conference.

During the first 11 months, domestic natural gas output rose 10.5 percent year-on-year to 133.8 billion cubic meters while imported gas soared 28.9 percent.

To make matters worse, China has experienced a cold winter this year, with temperatures dropping to -10 C or below, in some parts of North China. Even the city of Qingyuan, in the south, in Guangdong Province was hit by snow on Saturday.

"The goal of the no-coal campaign has not changed," Wang Gengchen, a Chinese Academy of Sciences Atmospheric Physics Institute research fellow, told the Global Times on Tuesday, "The government has adjusted its policy to deal with emerging problems, making things more flexible to fit the current situation."

Wang suggested that the government be patient in the goal-to-gas initiative and have the related policy moves more complete before they are put to the test.

In the winter season, cities and regions not equipped with electrically-controlled or natural gas heating facilities can use coal-fired furnaces or other options for heating," the Ministry of Environmental Protection confirmed with the Global Times on December 7.

 

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Parvin Faghfouri Azar
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Transition from Coal to Natural Gas Uneven in Practice

China's natural gas consumption has surged in the first 11 months of 2017 due to strong demand from industry and winter heating.
Parvin Faghfouri Azar
China's natural gas consumption has surged in the first 11 months of 2017 due to strong demand from industry and winter heating, official data showed Monday.The country saw a 18.9-percent year-on-year rise in natural gas consumption, which totaled 209.7 billion cubic meters in the January-November period, according to the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), the Xinhua News Agency reported.The growth was 12 percentage points higher than that in the first half of the year and more than 8 percentage points higher than the average growth in the previous five years, NDRC spokesperson Meng Wei said at a press conference.During the first 11 months, domestic natural gas output rose 10.5 percent year-on-year to 133.8 billion cubic meters while imported gas soared 28.9 percent.To make matters worse, China has experienced a cold winter this year, with temperatures dropping to -10 C or below, in some parts of North China. Even the city of Qingyuan, in the south, in Guangdong Province was hit by snow on Saturday."The goal of the no-coal campaign has not changed," Wang Gengchen, a Chinese Academy of Sciences Atmospheric Physics Institute research fellow, told the Global Times on Tuesday, "The government has adjusted its policy to deal with emerging problems, making things more flexible to fit the current situation."Wang suggested that the government be patient in the goal-to-gas initiative and have the related policy moves more complete before they are put to the test.In the winter season, cities and regions not equipped with electrically-controlled or natural gas heating facilities can use coal-fired furnaces or other options for heating," the Ministry of Environmental Protection confirmed with the Global Times on December 7. 
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